The People's Perspective on Medicine

Show 1175: How to Mix Conventional and Ayurvedic Medicine for Cancer

Hear how an American physician decided to mix allopathic and Ayurvedic medicine to treat his metastatic neck cancer. Should we all learn to combine them?
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How to Mix Conventional and Ayurvedic Medicine for Cancer

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When a doctor is diagnosed with cancer, you can bet he will try to find the best possible treatments for the disease. Dr. Timothy McCall has long added yoga and Ayurvedic medicine to his standard medical toolkit. So when he was diagnosed with neck cancer and couldn’t schedule the first allopathic (Western medicine) treatment right away, he found it natural to visit his friends in India. How did he mix allopathic and Ayurvedic medicine to treat oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer that had spread to his lymph nodes?

Ayurvedic Medicine to Strengthen the System:

Dr. McCall spent a month in India before he began chemoradiation in the US. The Ayurvedic treatments he got there were not intended to cure his neck cancer. For that, he would rely largely on his oncologist’s recommendations. Instead, he turned to Ayurveda to strengthen and balance his system before he started a potentially grueling cancer treatment in the US.

Negotiating with the Oncologist:

Many people don’t realize that they have a say in the cancer treatment they get. Dr. McCall had done research on the treatment of the neck cancer he had. It was caused by HPV (human papillomavirus) rather than by environmental insults like tobacco or alcohol. He negotiated with the radiation oncologist regarding the exact extent of radiation.

He took several steps to mix allopathic and Ayurvedic medicine to treat his neck cancer. Among other things, he found that an over-the-counter turmeric cream from India was helpful in counteracting the effects of radiation on his skin. In addition, yoga helped him maintain his energy throughout the treatment. Acupuncture was also helpful.

Starving the Cancer:

Another approach that Dr. McCall found useful was intermittent fasting. Fasting before his chemo infusions helped reduce the nausea that is usually associated with this treatment. He also used an informal type of hyperthermia–soaking in a hot tub to help heat up the lymph nodes affected by the cancer. While cancer cells are known to be sensitive to heat, this was not part of a clinical trial. Consequently, we don’t know whether it made a difference for his treatment.  

Should You Mix Allopathic and Ayurvedic Medicine?

Conventional medicine in comparison to holistic medicine is similar, he found, to conventional agriculture compared to organic gardening. Rather than choose one or the other, however, we might all benefit from considering how to mix allopathic and Ayurvedic or other therapies when faced with a health crisis.

This Week’s Guest:

Timothy McCall, MD, is a board-certified internist, Yoga Journal’s Medical Editor since 2002 and the bestselling author of Yoga as Medicine and Examining Your Doctor: A Patient’s Guide to Avoiding Harmful Medical Care. His latest book is Saving My Neck: A Doctor’s East/West Journey Through Cancer. He teaches yoga therapy seminars in the US and around the world.

His website is DrMcCall.com

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The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99.

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About the Author
Terry Graedon, PhD, is a medical anthropologist and co-host of The People’s Pharmacy radio show, co-author of The People’s Pharmacy syndicated newspaper columns and numerous books, and co-founder of The People’s Pharmacy website. Terry taught in the Duke University School of Nursing and was an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology. She is a Fellow of the Society of Applied Anthropology. Terry is one of the country's leading authorities on the science behind folk remedies. .
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I am a retired physician who 13 years ago began having recurrent diverticulitis episodes. They became so frequent that I was referred to a colo-rectal surgeon for possible removal of the colon. The diverticulitis was so widespread throughout the colon that the surgeon felt that 2/3 would have to be removed. I learned then about anthroposophy and its approach to medicine and saw a wonderful physician who combines anthroposophical and traditional medicine. My diverticulitis episodes are now much less frequent (reduced from 6 to 2 times/year) and much milder. I am now a firm believer in integrative medicine and hope that our medical education will soon be more aware and scientific studies funded to support what populations have experienced. Thanks for this program!

Great story. Thx for posting

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